How much is the fish, for cod’s sake?

“Fishy” technology to stop overfishing: This session will address the problem of overfishing, its causes and possible solutions. In order to maintain healthy marine ecosystems, we need to be informed and keep our governments accountable over their decisions that concern the environment and our future. Technology can help us in the quest to manage fish stocks and marine protected areas in a better and more transparent way.

Have you ever wondered where your seafood comes from? Do you know if this natural renewable resource is sustainable? Are you aware that overfishing is still a big problem in Europe and globally? Have you heard of pirate fishing in the 21st century?

This session will address the problem of overfishing, its causes and possible solutions. Currently, only a minority of European fish stocks can be considered well managed, and although there is serious concern about the state of some fisheries, the potential for recovery is huge and has been quantified by scientists. In order to maintain healthy marine ecosystems, we need to be informed and keep our governments accountable over their decisions that concern the environment and our future.

Technology can help to manage fish stocks and marine protected areas in a better and more transparent way. Satellite systems monitor fishing vessels’ activity, and the big data generated can be visualized in a publically accessible way. In addition, mobile applications and websites help fish identification, and blockchain use may increase seafood traceability. Technology also goes hand in hand with research and is indispensable for aiding in the exploration of the oceans. Monitoring can be conducted on the surface by drones and underwater by gliders (AUV), while we glimpse the deep-sea bottom by means of submarine robots (ROV).  All these devices can be used to better know and protect our oceans.

Join this session and release the Kraken!