re:publica 17 - Politics & Society

Politics and society, in all their many facets, have rarely been as of crucial topics as they are now and re:publica 2017 will be looking at this thematic closer than ever.

While civic tech is a natural thematic overlap for us, we will also be examining the interplay of technology and society on the day-to-day basis. Some of the success stories include increased awareness and defence of digital civil rights and the ongoing support from our and many other communities for refugees.

However, with algorithms, a post-factual age where examination and evaluation are near impossible, filter bubbles, and the apparent inability to create dialogue we can't ignore that some of these causes stem from this interplay of tech and society.

The question, of how we interact (digitally) with each other, remains: does the platform society influence the way we spread and shape our own opinions?

Legitimised, yet still scandalous, mass surveillance, targeted selection of data, digital policy, and social media shutdowns as means of control prior to elections will all be discussed in 2017.

How are the international movements for digital democracy and open data developing? What social and legislative processes should be initiated to shadow ever accelerating automation? Where humans reasoning fails, can the “incorruptible” blockchain deliver on its promise of outsourcing essential processes?

We want to create a space where we can dissect and analyse – and develop approaches to mitigate problematic developments. Despite all set-backs there is still room for success stories!

re:publica

Abonnieren

Follow us

Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Germany

Diskutieren lernen - Wie die Gesellschaft im post-medialen Zeitalter über ihre Konflikte ins Gespräch kommt

Christoph Kappes

Die zunehmenden Schwierigkeiten mit freier Rede im Internet, vor allem die Zunahme sprachlicher Entgleisungen, Hetze und Mobbing, verdeckt in der Öffentlichkeit ein anderes Problem: Echte Verständigung durch sachliche Auseinandersetzungen und dialogische Klärungen finden in sozialen Netzwerken kaum statt, weil diese formal so strukturiert sind, dass sie zu Entropie (Unordnung und Zerfall) neigen. Zugleich bespielt die klassische Medienöffentlichkeit den Diskursraum immer schlechter, weil sie durch Eigenlogik (z.B. Aufmerksamkeitskampf, Klickmaximierung und Schnelligkeit) weniger Authentizität, Nachdenklichkeit und Positionsvielfalt zeigt. Der einzige Weg aus dem Schlamassel: die Zivilgesellschaft muss nun selber lernen, wie sie fair und pluralistisch Debatten führt, und einen Weg dahin könnten die neuen kleinen Demokratie-Initiativen wie Schmalbart zeigen.

Diskutieren lernen - Wie die Gesellschaft im post-medialen Zeitalter über ihre Konflikte ins Gespräch kommt (de)

Christoph Kappes

Die zunehmenden Schwierigkeiten mit freier Rede im Internet, vor allem die Zunahme sprachlicher Entgleisungen, Hetze und Mobbing, verdeckt in der Öffentlichkeit ein anderes Problem: Echte Verständigung durch sachliche Auseinandersetzungen und dialogische Klärungen finden in sozialen Netzwerken kaum statt, weil diese formal so strukturiert sind, dass sie zu Entropie (Unordnung und Zerfall) neigen. Zugleich bespielt die klassische Medienöffentlichkeit den Diskursraum immer schlechter, weil sie durch Eigenlogik (z.B. Aufmerksamkeitskampf, Klickmaximierung und Schnelligkeit) weniger Authentizität, Nachdenklichkeit und Positionsvielfalt zeigt. Der einzige Weg aus dem Schlamassel: die Zivilgesellschaft muss nun selber lernen, wie sie fair und pluralistisch Debatten führt, und einen Weg dahin könnten die neuen kleinen Demokratie-Initiativen wie Schmalbart zeigen.

Digital Commons, Urban Struggles and the Right to the City?

Andreas Unteidig, Marco Clausen

Who has access? Who designs? Who uses and who profits of collaboratively produced content?
In this talk, we want to argue that these questions are not only equally relevant to the physical as well as the digital space, but increasingly interdependent. This is powerfully exemplified in many prevailing smart city visions, in which highly profitable dreams of streamlining, control and efficiency are being cultivated – predominantly by a handful of global enterprises.
Within the European MAZI-Network, we are querying alternatives to these corporate, top-down implemented and centralized futures. We seek to support and amplify these alternatives and we work on the development of counter-proposals, by connecting academia with urban activism in four different pilot studies across Europe.
In Berlin, the Design Research Lab of the University of the Arts is partnering with the Nachbarschaftsakademie (Neighborhood Academy) within Prinzessinnengärten: At Berlin‘s Moritzplatz, we are testing how affordable and open hardware together with open source knowledge can act as a toolkit, enabling local communities to create their very own “internet outside the internet”, and to employ network technology beyond the prescribed application of Facebook or Google.
To learn from practice, we are developing a locally constrained, community owned and maintained WIFI network with a set of custom designed applications. With this, we aim at providing a network for exchange, information and participation, and ultimately at the  amplification of Berlin‘s critical urban practice through technology.
By applying the Neighborhood Academy‘s core concept of “collective learning”, this process is decisively participatory and involves a wide range of actors and initiatives that are engaged in the struggles for the right to the city – both in spatial and in digital terms.
With this, we go beyond the mere development of technology and open up spaces for discussion on the interdependencies of Digital Commons, Urban Struggles and the Right to the City.

Advanced Social Media Verification: How to authenticate images & videos that emerge online

Claire Wardle, Isa Sonnenfeld

How can you verify the provenance, source, date and location of any piece of content so you can be confident that it is authentic? How do you build these workflows into your daily routines?

Yes, I said cyber. Digital security and rights in international development cooperation

Katrin Bornemann, Nathaniel A. Raymond, Mona Al achkar, Rahel Dette, Isabel Skierka

In the "cyber discourse" cross-border voices are often not heard. This notion is often closely linked to national security and keeps states currently on their toes. We need to and want to look beyond national borders as resilience of connected systems needs to be guaranteed also on a global level. However, collaboration in the field of security has its pitfalls. Under which circumstances can one country strengthen the cyber capacities of another country? How do human rights based approaches to cyber security strategies look like? It is difficult to make security as a task for international cooperation tangible, but it is necessary. Should experts, the government, NGOs or watchdogs be responsible for cyber capacity building? How can technical and practical know-how about internet risks reach also the most remote regions? Who guarantees that the digital transformation does not reinforce inequalities or that deficits in cyber capacities do not hamper development? In regard to these questions one has to keep always in mind that new cyber security strategies should be developed according to the needs of the population and that freedoms and rights are guaranteed.

Diskutieren lernen - Wie die Gesellschaft im post-medialen Zeitalter über ihre Konflikte ins Gespräch kommt (en)

Christoph Kappes

Die zunehmenden Schwierigkeiten mit freier Rede im Internet, vor allem die Zunahme sprachlicher Entgleisungen, Hetze und Mobbing, verdeckt in der Öffentlichkeit ein anderes Problem: Echte Verständigung durch sachliche Auseinandersetzungen und dialogische Klärungen finden in sozialen Netzwerken kaum statt, weil diese formal so strukturiert sind, dass sie zu Entropie (Unordnung und Zerfall) neigen. Zugleich bespielt die klassische Medienöffentlichkeit den Diskursraum immer schlechter, weil sie durch Eigenlogik (z.B. Aufmerksamkeitskampf, Klickmaximierung und Schnelligkeit) weniger Authentizität, Nachdenklichkeit und Positionsvielfalt zeigt. Der einzige Weg aus dem Schlamassel: die Zivilgesellschaft muss nun selber lernen, wie sie fair und pluralistisch Debatten führt, und einen Weg dahin könnten die neuen kleinen Demokratie-Initiativen wie Schmalbart zeigen.

Deep Shit: Paradigms, Paranoia and Politics of Machine Intelligence (en)

Paul Feigelfeld

Digital warfare from highly complex and clandestine weapons systems like Stuxnet to brute force DDoS attacks like the recent ones carried out by the Mirai botnet, to algorithmic manipulation à la Cambridge Analytica call for highly urgent reforms in international law and war conventions, as well as new forms of critical practice and theory in all fields and across all disciplines.

Is Freedom the most expensive word? A journey to North Korea (en)

Renata Avila, Maja Pelevic

After the fall of the Berlin Wall, the dissolution of socialist project and the breakup of Yugoslavia, the only island still surviving in isolation, thus constantly arousing interest and contempt in the West as the only remnant of the Cold War, is North Korea. The image of North Korean people “suffering under totalitarian oppression” is one of the most spectacular and most fantastic ones.
The image of North Korea which reaches the West, the way its interiors, architecture, monuments, the government, repression and mass events are represented, absolutely equals the dystopias seen in Science Fiction movies, where all freedom is abolished. North Korea functions, thus, as a kind of unconscious western world, the dark spot on which all the gulags, torture, state supervision over individuals, etc. are projected. The projection of repression over the Other is ideal for masking one’s own repressive, non-democratic practices, such as the struggle against terrorism, the Greek crisis and the refugee crisis. Therefore, by speaking of North Korea, we also speak of America, of the EU, of Serbia.
The interactive talk will discuss contemporary problems using North Korea as frame and a highly creative format, as the conversation will show pictures, videos and vividly describe situations of a trip to Pyongyang, letting the audience interact and share questions about it, from the Internet and surveillance while you are visiting a dictatorship to questions on our current degrees of freedom in the west. 

History of DDoS: from digital civil disobedience to online censorship (en)

Floriana Pagano, Donncha O Cearbhaill

During this session we will offer a short history of DDoS – from the Zapatistas’ use of Floodnet and the “Netstrikes” and “Virtual Sit-Ins” at the turn of the millennium, to Anonymous’ campaigns and political actions against Estonia, Georgia and Ukraine, up to more recent and disruptive episodes like the attacks against Krebs on Security and Dyn. A description of 3 case studies reported by Deflect Labs in 2016 – targeting an independent news site in Ukraine, the website of the Palestinian global campaign BDS Movement and the official website of Black Lives Matter – will illustrate how DDoS is being used by governments, local authorities and hacker crews alike to censor critical voices online. Beyond the hype generated by Mirai and other software for managing botnets, launching a DDoS attack is becoming easier and cheaper by the day, and the risk of a “democratization of online censorship”, as Brian Krebs has called it, is growing.
Even if websites of independent media and civil society organizations can be protected by free DDoS mitigation infrastructures like Deflect.ca, the protection measures these services can offer have their limits, and it’s important to explore solutions based on community action.
This session will aim at starting a conversation with groups that are particularly vulnerable to DDoS attacks, to find common ground in solidarity against the threat of DDoS-based censorship. How big are the risks? What are our needs before, during and after the attacks? How can we defend ourselves and band together to do so more effectively?
During the second part of the session the public will be invited to share their experiences of DDoS attacks, those at risk of attack to discuss their needs, and those in a position to help to consider how we can collaborate.
The purpose of this session is to gather information on our community’s needs and capabilities and to start developing standards for threat-intelligence sharing among peers and participants of re:publica.

Cypherpunks - Kryptographische Technologien als politisches Projekt

Emanuel Löffler

Verschlüsselungstools wie PGP, Anonymisierungssysteme wie Tor und digitales Geld werden oft als politisch neutrale Technologien betrachtet. Sie sollen lediglich freie Kommunikation ermöglichen. Ein Blick in die Anfänge ihrer Entwicklung zeigt jedoch, dass ihre Entwicklung nie auf neutralem Boden stattfand, ja dass Verschlüsselung bis in ihre antiken Anfänge politisch war.
Als sich die Cypherpunks zu Beginn der 1990er Jahre zusammenschlossen, um Crypto-Tools so weit wie möglich auf Heimsystemen zu verbreiten, geschah dies erstmals mit einer ausdrücklich politischen Motivation. Ideologische Leitfiguren waren dabei zumeist Männer wie John Perry Barlow, Timothy May oder Eric Hughes, deren Ideen die Diskussion um das Recht auf Crypto und Anonymität bis heute prägen.
Sie gingen weiter, als sich das viele heute noch trauen würden und sahen in den neuen Technologien bahnbrechende Entwicklungen angelegt, die die Welt grundlegend verändern sollten. Im anonymen Internet (T. May nannte es Blacknet), sollten Steuern und Zölle umgangen und somit Staaten entmachtet werden. Auf restliche unliebsame Politiker*innen sollten Auftragsmorde angesetzt werden und ein Reputationssystem sollte alte Eliten ablösen.
Die Staatsfeindlichkeit Mays findes sich in abgeschwächter Form auch bei Hughes und Barlow und ist insgesamt von einem Optimismus getragen, dass Internet und Crypto die Welt schon auf den richtigen Weg bringen würden. Diese Ansichten unterscheiden sich nicht wesentlich von radikalen liberalen Theorien und neokonservativen Denkansätzen wie die von Rand, Nozick und Konkin, die sich teils schon vor der Geschichte des Internets etablierten.
Obwohl Anonymisierungs- und Crypto-Tools einen unglaublichen Siegeszug hinter sich gelegt haben, haben sich die Visionen der Cypherpunks nicht verwirklicht. Ich werde in meinem Vortrag diese Visionen der tatsächlichen Entwicklung der letzten 25 Jahre gegenüberstellen und auf die Frage eingehen, warum wir nicht im Crypto-Anarchismus leben.